Session 10 - From "Me" to "We" to "One"

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We don't need to count our desires. Whether it is desires for food, sex, family, money, respect, power, and knowledge, or whether it is hundreds of other desires deriving from them, we don't need to occupy ourselves with the desires themselves, but rather with how we use them, meaning with our intention with regard to them. What's important is the direction I am aiming my intention, when I use all of my "self," all of my desires. I need to transform the use of each and every one of my abilities to be in favor of society, for the best benefit of all.


Then my entire "me" becomes "we," and the "we," which is seemingly a collection of individuals, becomes "one." And this "one" that is in equivalent connection is already in balance with that singular law that organizes us, and which is together with us, in a good and favorable connection.


Thus, a person becomes a human being that has truly become humane, and is one who understands one's overall nature. On the way toward it, he or she has learned many psychological rules, and all the rules of reality. At that time, a person becomes included with all that exists in Nature, thus achieving the highest degree of development, the degree of the singular force that operates on us, and that draws us toward it, even though now it appears as though we are being drawn toward this through crisis, when we are included with Nature, the crisis will disappear.

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Topic

In correcting the desire from using it for my own good to using it for the good of all, we change our perspective from "me" to "we," and are made one body.

Main Points

  • The problem is not our desires, but rather the form in which we use them.
  • Connecting all humans together as one, brings us to balance with the one law in nature.
  • Through understanding the general law of nature, the person recognizes and understands all the laws of reality, in all planes of existence.

References

"The balance of nature has been a background assumption in natural history since antiquity, but even to the present it has seldom been closely studied."

Abstract - Changing Concepts of the Balance of Nature

"Planetary democracy does not yet exist, but our global civilization is already preparing a place for it: It is the very Earth we inhabit, linked with Heaven above us. Only in this setting can the mutuality and the commonality of the human race be newly created, with reverence and gratitude for that which transcends each of us, and all of us together. The authority of a world democratic order simply cannot be built on anything else but the revitalized authority of the universe."

Article - The Current Global Crisis and the Future of Humanity

We live in a man-made environment, which causes us to forget our total dependence on nature.

Book: From Naked Ape to Super Species: A Personal Perspective on Humanity and the Global Ecocrisis

Engage Yourself

Question 1: "I think that the individual person is aroused to find meaning in many ways, but we especially find meaning when we discover new connections for which we can sacrifice our personal freedom."

Arnold Bishop, the author of the quote mentioned above, is a counselor for youth at risk, whose unique approach to working with youth, merits appreciation throughout the world.  But mostly, Arnold Bishop is a person with an interesting point of view about the world in which we live.  Join us in a conversation with Bishop, in order to tour the ghettos of Los Angeles, the environment in which he works. [link to video here, if needed.]

Which of the following quotations from the lesson, has the widest common denominator with the words of Bishop.

Question 2: According to the text of the lesson, what is not good for our desires?

Question 3: What is the right order of the correction of the usage of desire?

Question 4: Rodrigue Tremblay, professor of economics at the University of Quebec is one of the most esteemed economists in Canada.  Among other things, Tremblay served as an economic advisor to the National Bank of Canada and the United Nations.  Here is a quotation from an essay that Tremblay published in 2011 on the subject of global civilization:

"Albert Einstein once said "We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive." —I certainly agree. I would add that we should all hope that human beings, who, of all of the species that have ever existed on the Planet Earth, have evolved into a relatively high stage of intelligence and of conscience, would be intelligent enough to bring this evolution to a higher level of global morality."

Next is a quote from the text of the lesson:

"Thus, a person becomes a human being that has truly become humane, and is one who understands one's overall nature. On the way toward it, he or she has learned many psychological rules, and all the rules of reality. At that time, a person becomes included with all that exists in Nature, thus achieving the highest degree of development, the degree of the singular force that operates on us, and that draws us toward it."

Supported by the words of Tremblay and the text from the lesson, how would you describe life when we reach a level in which we understand the whole of nature? How do we relate to the world in which we live, how do we relate to each other, how do we see daily life, etc. Please give extensive details: